COLOURFULWORLD

Wednesday, 14 April 2021

Signs - Hahndorf

Joining Tom's signs. For other signs from around the world please follow this link

Photos taken a few years ago on a visit to the small town of Hahndorf, about 30min south-east of Adelaide in South Australia.

Hahndorf was settled by Lutheran migrants in the 19th century and is known for its original German style architecture and food. It is also home to the German Migration Museum and is surrounded by various wineries.

Our village shall become more beautiful

Apart from having lunch at a German restaurant we also came across a Portuguese restaurant (we are everywhere!) and then had dinner there.


Canetoads were introduced to northern Australia from Hawai in 1935, with the purpose of controlling the native cane beetle which were destroying sugar crops, to avoid the use of pesticides which would kill harmless insects as well.
Instead, there is no evidence the canetoads have affected the cane beetles they were introduced to prey upon, and in the meantime they have multiplied and multiplied to over 200 million and have been known to spread diseases affecting local biodiversity.  
(And this isn't the only introduced predator to Australia that has done more harm than good - rabbits, camels, feral pigs, red foxes...)

Meaning = there are loads of vineyards in South Australia :)


38 comments:

  1. ...immigration spreads cultures around the world. I wouldn't have thought of Germans in Australia. Thanks Samis for stopping by, take care.

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    1. Not a big community overall, but that area of South Australia has kept the German traditions and is now a big tourist attraction.

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  2. Some things come to a new land and are good and others are not. I can see why cane toads were so deadly. Hadn't heard of them before and looked them up.

    Have a fabulous day, Sami. ♥

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    1. The cane toads have been a great pest indeed. Thanks Sandee.

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  3. 1995, Sami. I was SO.darn.disappointed.
    Australia! Red sand, dunes and all that and we took off from Sydney and next were in Hahndorf and there I was. Cherry trees. Wilhelm Busch!!!
    8 km from Seesen, where I grew up!
    I came all the way for THAT?! (No one spoke German, though!)

    Canetoads, oh, yes, like bunnies.... (Don´t tell Grace, there is a The Simpson-episode on the first! In the end a Koala makes it´s way to America).

    I think we just rushed through Hahndorf after I saw Wilhelm Busch...

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    1. I quite enjoyed Hanhdorf and we met some German speaking people in the restaurant. Apparently there's still about 400 German speaking residents there.

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    2. Maybe I was too grumpy to even find out!... ;-)

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  4. Never heard of german migrants in Australia, but they are considered everywhere as a positive, constructing community.The german language, though, is not easy to master.

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    1. Thanks Duta. German is not easy to learn for sure, I know I lived in Germany for about 6 years in the 1980's.

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  5. I also had no idea Germans immigrated to Australia. I was surprised and certainly learned something through these signs.

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    1. Thanks Elizabeth, Australia is just like America a country of immigrants - nearly half of the population is either first or second generation migrants and the other half third generation Australians.

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  6. I learned something new today! I've never heard of a canetoad. How interesting (and how sad they can't be controlled.)

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    1. We are always learning Jeanie. I had never heard of canetoads before coming to Australia either. They are scary, to me at least.

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  7. I never heard of a cane toad either. It's sad that they can't be controlled. I just read a piece about them. Invasive and not good. Thanks for today's lesson.

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    1. Thanks Bill, we are always learning interesting things.

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  8. Vineyards come and go. Another crop in abundance now is almond trees that use huge quantities of water, all to make almond milk.

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    1. Thanks Andrew, like any business some wineries will do well others not, might depend on how good their wine is :)

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  9. It doesn't surprise me that Germans would have made a new home in a distant part of the world.

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    1. Most Germans were fleeing from religious persecution at home. During the II world war they were discriminated against for being German, specially in areas like Hanhdorf.

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  10. Estamos em todo o lado, Não haja dúvida. Qualquer reportagem que haja nas notícias de uma catástrofe na zona mais recôndita do mundo, descobre-se um português que (felizmente) se salvou pronto a dar a sua opinião :)
    Belos sinais.
    Bom dia

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    1. Penso que nao havera muitos paises onde nao haja um Portugues :)
      Obrigada Paula

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  11. Australia has not fared well with introduced species, even the white two-legged kind the Aborigines might say! But as for the ubiquity of wineries, how utterly civilized is that!

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    1. They certainly haven't had a good outcome with introduced species.
      No lack of good wine for sure David :)

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  12. invasive species are not good in many places.
    thank you to let's know about German village in Australia

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  13. This is a wonderful trip down memory lane for us too. I remember Harndorf as being very picturesque as well as the wine and chocolates!
    Have a great weekend.
    Wren x

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    1. Glad this post brought you some good memories Wren.

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  14. great post, thank you. i learned something new today.
    cheap lace front wigs

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  15. The cane toads are disgusting Sami, let's hope they manage to keep them out of WA.

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  16. I'd not heard of cane toads before!

    All the best Jan

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